Kids That Talk Back

Joe Settler writes:

We were in the park yesterday when one child, perhaps 6 or 7, was wildly swinging one of the toys in the park in a way that was extremely dangerous to anyone else playing or walking nearby.

My wife went over and nicely asked him to stop, explaining that what he was doing was very dangerous to the other children, especially the smaller children.

Instead of stopping, this little kid had the Chutzpah to say (and say it in a way that was extremely Chutzpadik) that the small kids shouldn’t play there, and he will keep doing swinging the toy however he likes. She should go to another other area.

Read the whole thing.

What do you think? How would you handle the child? Do you think a politician can help? How could a teacher help? Feel free to comment both here and on his post.

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6 thoughts on “Kids That Talk Back

  • I’ll try to throw in my 2 cents as a citizen and as a teacher.
    – I’d would have done the same as Joe Settler’s wife.
    – I’m afraid politicians don’t really like to stress parental resposibility because parents are voters too. In France, they like to put the blame on the teachers who are either unable to deal with deruptive kids or are so incompetent they can’t motivate kids so they become distruptive. In public schools it is very hard to punish a student let alone sack them.

  • As a parent you have the responsibility to protect your children. It is right to talk to the other parent. If you have to move for your safety, you must. But you have the right not to be hurt.

    Dumb parents…if they allow anything to go now, wait until the kid is older…

  • I’d definitely have said something. A few months ago I could a bunch of teenagers playing “glass coke bottle basketball” (and missing!) in our local playground, and threw a HUGE fit until I had them all on their hands and knees picking up shards of broken glass. They weren’t happy, but the crazy lady yelling at them was willing to call the cops, so they finally cleaned up the very dangerous mess they’d made.

    I still get mad thinking about their incredible stupidity and arrogance.

  • Aack. Obviously that was supposed to be I “caught” a bunch of teenagers, not I could a bunch of teenagers. When oh when will comments be editable…

  • No 6 year old should be allowed to talk to an adult like that. Good for Joe Settler’s wife for not backing down. Why weren’t his parents with him in the park?
    I, like Robin, have also confronted misbehaving children. In my neighborhood, the young teenagers like to set off (illegal) firecrackers at night. The noise drives me crazy. Just last week, I went berserk at them when they started up. One kid said “Sorry lady” and they all ran away. Next time they’ll know better than to tick off SuperRaizy!

  • Where were his parents?

    In our mixed neighborhood, disguised multi-cultural conflicts sometimes arise, in the form of “don’t you tell me what to do” type remarks, on the part of children and parents alike. It can be delicate.

    Going beserk can work pretty well, actually. So do scare tactics — sometimes I tell the perpetrator about things I’ve seen in the hospital. I mention it casually, almost nonchalantly, no yelling involved. When the story is gory enough (I don’t mince words) they get the message pretty quick.

    The most important thing is not to put anyone on the defensive, so they can “choose” to stop misbehaving. Otherwise they go on the attack. Instead, emphasize that it is your responsibility to protect your own child. That relieves the guilt / nu-nu-nu factor.

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