Nature Notes: Spring Trees

nature-noteMichelle at Rambling Woods writes:

I am going to challenge myself and hopefully you to take a look at nature. What is going on in your area? Is it spring in your part of the world or are you heading into cold weather. Take a little walk….. look at something you might never had paid attention to..a flower…a animal…What changes are taking place?..Is your garden starting to come to life again?..Step outside and close your eyes. What do you hear? …take a deep breath…What do you smell?

I’d really like to know how my blogger friends feel about what they observe in nature. Post a photo..a poem..artwork or a even few words about what you see and how it made you feel…

Focusing on trees that are changing in the spring, here’s a photo of a cherry blossom on my neighbor’s tree. I love the green, yellow and blue that I achieved in the background of this photo.

Another photo of a cherry blossom is presented.

My little bald cypress tree is growing and thriving. The leaves are now green, but last fall they had a bright orange brown hue (bald cypress is the tree in foreground):

You may recall that I initially thought this tree in Donaldson Park was a red bud tree, but in fact it was identified as a red maple. The photo above shows a red bud tree that is growing in front of my neighbor’s home.

The red bud tree looks so pretty in the spring; I think the red is of a purplish shade.

Some birds have built a nest in our air-conditioner. We don’t know why or how they fit in that tiny space, but we sometimes hear them tweeting in there during the day. My neighbor thinks they are sparrows.

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8 thoughts on “Nature Notes: Spring Trees

  • Oh this is lovely Leora…There is something so delicate about the cherry blossoms. I don’t think anyone has one around here, but I am going to take a look..another Nature Notes inspiration..go and look at other yards and their trees. I think that nest probably is house sparrows. It looks pretty sloppy and that is a hallmark of the HOSP. Also they have 2-3 broods a year. When they build in our gutters, we remove them. They aren’t native and are not protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty so they can be removed. The same goes for the european starlings…Thank you for this lovely post for Nature Notes… Michelle

  • fun to see blossom and then tree; blossom and then tree. here we have been in the mid 90s which we usually dont see until August so the idea is to find somewhere to hide indoors until the sun goes down.

  • Cherry blossoms are truly some of the prettiest blooms out there.

    I hope the nest isn’t hurt or the noise too loud for any baby birds when it comes time to start using the air conditioner.

    • We had them there last year. And they’ve come back this year. The AC isn’t on yet (this is NJ, not Israel! ;-). We wonder, too, if the birds have made a good choice. But I don’t want to touch it.

  • Your photos are lovely, wonderful images of nature’s beauty in all its phases, bud to bloom, seasons and tones.

    My blog of today is about nature, nature and Judaism.

  • I would love to be able to smell those Cherry blossoms. The color of the fall leaves added a great splash to your notes and I had a great time reading and seeing the sights!

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