Pesach Recipes and Musings

Sponge Cake 2008, watercolor by Leora Wenger
Sponge Cake 2008, watercolor by Leora Wenger

I got two endearing comments last night on my sponge cake recipe (or Esther Robfogel’s z”l recipe) that I posted two years ago:

Esther G. Robfogel (1904-1997) was my mother. I ate her excellent sponge cakes on Pesach and throughout the year for many decades. I hope that my granddaughter, Esther F. Robfogel, will carry on the tradition.
– Nathan J. Robfogel

I’m Esther Robfogel’s daughter. Although I used to bake with my mom, baking was never my forte. As it happens, I was thinking about making mom’s cake this year. After reading your blog, I know I will. Thanks.
– Hanna

For more recipes, be sure to visit Phyllis’ aka Imabima’s latest posting of the Kosher Cooking Carnival, Rosh Chodesh Nisan edition.

Also see:

On a sad note, two men in Teaneck, New Jersey died walking home from shul at the end of Shabbat when a tree fell on them. I can’t imagine what Pesach is going to be like for those two mourning families.

10 thoughts on “Pesach Recipes and Musings

  • That’s so cool that her children commented on your blog!

    May both families be comforted among the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim, and may this month be one of besurot tovot, yeshu’ot, and nechamot (good tidings, salvation, and consolation).

  • very special when someone who is more or less directly connected to a person you mention comments on your blog. I am happy for you that you got these two comments.
    Thanks for the links to my blog.

  • The loss of those lives in the wake of the storm saddens «Louis». Even though he’s thousands of miles from New Jersey and doesn’t know those families, he wishes he could offer them some measure of comfort.
    – • –

    Your watercolor perfectly captures the delicate nature of the sponge cake!

    Question about the recipe: by cake meal, do you mean cake flour?

    • Louis, since you don’t celebrate Passover, you could try this with regular flour. Or cake flour.

      Cake meal is finely ground matza. You can buy it in supermarkets that have a Jewish community at this time of year. We are not allowed to bake with regular flour during Passover. Some people are even stricter, and they won’t eat this recipe (it is called ‘gebrokts’ to them, because the matza touches moisture).

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