Creamy Chickpea Soup

chickpea soup
This chickpea soup can warm your soul, whether it’s summer and served cold or fall and served warm. I got the recipe from the Macrobiotic Recipes page on Facebook. The original author is Montse Bradford, and I added amounts and tweaked the recipe a bit.


  • chickpeas – 8 oz.
  • kombu (or a little bit of any kind of seaweed)
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 onion
  • 1 stalk celery
  • garlic – 1 clove
  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. miso

Garnish (optional): cucumber, bread croutons, parsley, spring onions.

How to Make the Chickpea Soup

Soak chickpeas overnight with plenty of cold water. Discard soaking water. Place chickpeas in a pressure cooker or a crock pot with the kombu and water completely covering the beans. Bring to a boil, discard any loose skins or foam that arises to the surface. Cook until till soft.

Saute separately some finely diced onion and minced garlic with some olive oil for 10 minutes. Add diced carrots and celery to the onion. Let it cook for 5 minutes, then add it to the chickpeas. Simmer for 15 minutes. Put the soup in the food processor (or use a stick blender) and blend for a short time, so it’s a bit chunky. Season to taste with some miso. Make sure to add the miso when it’s still warm – the miso will blend better with the soup. You can serve this chickpea soup cold or warm.

I garnished my soup with scallions.

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8 thoughts on “Creamy Chickpea Soup

  • The soup dish looks yummy. To be honest I don’t have much experience with chickpeas.
    I found to bags of frozen vegetables in the freezer the other day, brought home by daughter Serina. She was in charge of the kitchen while my mother was at the hospital.
    Anyway, the mix was primarily chickpeas. They tasted well, and were welcomed by the rest of the family. When I grew up ( 50ies – 60ies) my mother bought yellow peas, which had to swell in water overnight before she used them for soups. Can they be the same?? Somehow the chickpeas seemed to taste milder. That may have something to do with my fading memory.

    Thanks for the hugs. They did the heart warming trick.
    I’m reading your niece’s blog, but haven’t been able to comment much lately. She seems to be adopting well, searching the spirit of Norway, and even more the spirit and mind of each student. She’s got the true heart of a good teacher.

    • I’m glad the hugs helped! Your post a few weeks back, when your mother first got ill, sounded so lonely.

      My niece is quite something. Much more adaptable and resilient than I will ever be.

      The ones your mother bought were probably dry beans. The frozen ones sound like they have been pre-cooked, making it much easier to prepare them.

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