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Bird with Speckled Breast

July 3rd, 2012 by

bird with speckled breast
What kind of a bird has a speckled breast? I found out that some thrushes do, but this bird is a juvenile robin. Makes sense, since last summer I asked the same question about the speckled breast. Thanks, Michelle, for identifying my young robin.

bird on wire speckled breast
Just last week I saw baby robins in a nest; when my daughter and I checked on Saturday, they were still in the nest, cawing away, and just a bit bigger. She counted four baby robins.

Do you know of a bird with speckled breast?

For a fun review, here are thumbs of my posts on robins:
blue eggs in a robin's nest baby robin robins with feathers
robin crying with open mouth robin with speckles on its back robin with green caterpillar
robin on a branch robin on rooftop robin
The upper left shows a blue robin egg. Then the robin babies are born, and they depend on mama and papa robin. After a while, the baby robins get more feathers and fly off from the nest. A young robin is a bird with speckled breast. The mature robin has a red breast. I’ve seen robins with worms in their mouths. I’ve also seen them eating my raspberries.

For more Nature Notes:
Nature Notes

29 Responses to Bird with Speckled Breast

  1. Daniel Saunders says:

    Interesting that American robins seem to look quite different to the robins we get in London – the American ones seem taller and thinner, with grey wings and black heads instead of browney ones.

  2. He’s got freckles :).

  3. Jewaicious says:

    What lovely photos. I am reminiscing of photos I have taken of robins, and I must go through my DVDs and get my bird photos together.

  4. EG Wow says:

    Robins are a kind of thrush so it makes sense to me that a baby robin might have a speckled breast. Hmmm. They eat my raspberries too!

    • Leora says:

      Cool. I did not know that robins are a type of thrush.

      The birds would peck at the strawberries, too, but I didn’t see as many robins when the strawberries were in bloom last month. Seems to be the season for robins and rabbits in Highland Park.

  5. Libby says:

    I did not know robins were thrushes either! I love the collage on baby robins!

    I did not recognize the young robin in the first picture either ;)

    • Leora says:

      Ha! So it’s good I wrote “bird” instead of “robin” in my title – leaves a bit of mystery until you read the body of the post.

  6. Carver says:

    I see Michelle already answered you about the teenager robins. That’s one of the juveniles I can identify because I watch them grow up. The only confusion for me is in the trees if I don’t see the beak and wings, it’s easy for me to mistake juvenile robins for brown thrashers who have the same breast as juvenile robins (the speckled part) but brown thrasher have much longer beaks and their wings are brown. They are also somewhat larger (thrashers).

  7. Hannah says:

    The robins in France seem to be the same as the British ones! Nice photos.

  8. Eileen says:

    the baby robins are adorable. I love their speckled chest. Wonderful mosaic and photos, Leora. Wishing you a happy 4th of July!

  9. When the English first came to this country they named the american robin after their own robin as it reminded them of their own. You are getting fantastic photos..I have not seen one juve robin here so I am enjoying these photos…Michelle

  10. Pat says:

    Cute baby Robins!

  11. Celeste says:

    Great photos. The American Robin looks very similar to some of the European Thrush species, check out the Song Thrush or the Mistle Thrush, I think you will see the family resemblance.

  12. Patti says:

    when do juvenile robins lose their speckled breasts and replace with red breasts?

    • Leora says:

      It seems they are juveniles for one season?, but I can’t find much information about this detail. I’ll have to ask one of my birding expert friends.

      I did find this: “By October, young robins have lost just about all their spotted feathers.”
      http://www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/robin/ExpertAnswer03.html

      • Patti says:

        Thanks! It will much easier to follow them when their spotted feathers are gone if their breasts will turn red quickly! Otherwise, there are some other birds that are similar looking. We are in the mountains of Southern California with a wide variety of birds. I am so happy that all 5 baby robins have stayed in our area with the mother robin. Even after 2 weeks of them having left the nest she is still flying to them and subsidizing their feedings. She is relentless and must be exhausted!

      • Leora says:

        Oh, we had the pleasure of baby robins hatching on our porch a few years ago. Enjoy nature’s show.

  13. Patti says:

    We are truly enjoying “the show.” It is so awewome and amazing to the extent that we are not getting much done these days! I am in the process of finding an online supplier of earthworms from whom I can buy in bulk!

  14. Alyce-Kay says:

    I’m not surprised they go after your raspberries. I throw berries or grapes or cherries out in my yard. It seems like the only thing the robins are interested in. I love to watch them pecking at a cherry that’s part of a threesome. When they peck at one, the others “follow” and the robin jumps back, startled.

    • Leora says:

      Hm, at the price of cherries, can’t imagine throwing them in the yard. I rarely buy grapes, because most are inorganic here.

      I’ll have to settle for sharing my raspberries.

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